Michael Reeves and the ridiculous Subscriber Robot

At the beginning of his new build’s video, YouTuber Michael Reeves discusses a revelation he had about why some people don’t subscribe to his channel:

The real reason some people don’t subscribe is that when you hit this button, that’s all, that’s it, it’s done. It’s not special, it’s not enjoyable. So how do we make subscribing a fun, enjoyable process? Well, we do it by slowly chipping away at the content creator’s psyche every time someone subscribes.

His fix? The ‘fun’ interactive Subscriber Robot that is the subject of the video.

Be aware that Michael uses a couple of mild swear words in this video, so maybe don’t watch it with a child.

The Subscriber Robot

Just showing that subscriber dedication My Patreon Page: https://www.patreon.com/michaelreeves Personal Site: https://michaelreeves.us/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/michaelreeves08 Song: Summer Salt – Sweet To Me

Who is Michael Reeves?

Software developer and student Michael Reeves started his YouTube account a mere four months ago, with the premiere of his robot that shines lasers into your eyes – now he has 110k+ subscribers. At only 19, Michael co-owns and manages a company together with friends, and is set on his career path in software and computing. So when he is not making videos, he works a nine-to-five job “to pay for college and, y’know, live”.

The Subscriber Robot

Michael shot to YouTube fame with the aforementioned laser robot built around an Arduino. But by now he has also be released videos for a few Raspberry Pi-based contraptions.

Michael Reeves Raspberry Pi Subscriber Robot

Michael, talking us through the details of one of the worst ideas ever made

His Subscriber Robot uses a series of Python scripts running on a Raspberry Pi to check for new subscribers to Michael’s channel via the YouTube API. When it identifies one, the Pi uses a relay to make the ceiling lights in Michael’s office flash ten times a second while ear-splitting noise is emitted by a 102-decibel-rated buzzer. Needless to say, this buzzer is not recommended for home use, work use, or any use whatsoever! Moreover, the Raspberry Pi also connects to a speaker that announces the name of the new subscriber, so Michael knows who to thank.

Michael Reeves Raspberry Pi Subscriber Robot

Subscriber Robot: EEH! EEH! EEH! MoistPretzels has subscribed.
Michael: Thank you, MoistPretzels…

Given that Michael has gained a whopping 30,000 followers in the ten days since the release of this video, it’s fair to assume he is currently curled up in a ball on the office floor, quietly crying to himself.

If you think Michael only makes videos about ridiculous builds, you’re mistaken. He also uses YouTube to provide educational content, because he believes that “it’s super important for people to teach themselves how to program”. For example, he has just released a new C# beginners tutorial, the third in the series.

Support Michael

If you’d like to help Michael in his mission to fill the world with both tutorials and ridiculous robot builds, make sure to subscribe to his channel. You can also follow him on Twitter and support him on Patreon.

You may also want to check out the Useless Duck Company and Simone Giertz if you’re in the mood for more impractical, yet highly amusing, robot builds.

Good luck with your channel, Michael! We are looking forward to, and slightly dreading, more videos from one of our favourite new YouTubers.

The post Michael Reeves and the ridiculous Subscriber Robot appeared first on Raspberry Pi.


Source: RaspberryPi – IOT Anonimo

Source: Privacy Online

TekThing 138 – You Can Make Eclipse Glasses, Password Managers Hacked? How To Set Up G-SYNC Gaming!

Cereal Box Beats $50 Eclipse Glasses, Download Google Maps, Elcomsoft Password Manager Crack, G-Sync Gaming Tested!
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30:00 Eclipse Photography!
Eclipse 2017 is almost here!!! Shannon built a camera filter for solar photography with a SIOTI modular filter holder, a solar sheet, and some tape and cardboard. Where do you attach the filter? How big will the sun be with a 240mm lens? A 1000mm lens? Find out in the video!
http://www.eclipse2017.org/
http://www.mreclipse.com/
http://www.scopestuff.com/ss_asmsf.pdf
http://amzn.to/2vG516r
http://amzn.to/2i2XtHM
http://www.mreclipse.com/Totality2/TotalityCh12-2.html#Image_Size

07:47 Don’t Have Eclipse Glasses?
We bought eclipse glasses early… if you can’t find any, we’ve got links to check at Amazon, what to look for in your local welding shop, why the welding glasses at the big box store won’t work, and, hey, if you have a cereal box, a couple of Pringles cans, or paper for a pinhole projector… you can safely view the eclipse!
http://amzn.to/2vFV0WM
http://amzn.to/2fPJrIy
https://eclipse2017.nasa.gov/sites/default/files/EclipseCerealBoxViewer.pdf
http://www.popularmechanics.com/science/news/a27553/diy-pinhole-sun-viewer/
https://eclipse.aas.org/eye-safety/projection

12:38 AMD Radeon Vega
AMD’s new Radeon Vega 64 and 56 are on sale and have finally been benchmarked! How do they fare against NVIDIA’s GTX 1080Ti, 1080, and 1070? Watch the video to find out!
https://www.pcper.com/reviews/Graphics-Cards/AMD-Radeon-RX-Vega-Review-Vega-64-Vega-64-Liquid-Vega-56-Tested
https://www.newegg.com/Product/ProductList.aspx?Submit=ENE&DEPA=0&Order=BESTMATCH&Description=radeon+vega&ignorear=0&N=100007709%20601301447&isNodeId=1

15:03 G-SYNC GAMING
Alienware sent us their new 25″ 1080p G-SYNC monitor, aka the AW2518H. We’ve never tested G-SYNC (or AMD’s FreeSync) or a 240Hz monitor before! We walk you through what G-SYNC does to fix screen tearing, and how to set it up in the video!
http://www.dell.com/en-us/shop/new-alienware-25-gaming-monitor-aw2518h/apd/210-amsr/monitors-monitor-accessories
https://www.geforce.com/hardware/technology/g-sync/supported-gpus
http://international.download.nvidia.com/geforce-com/international/videos/NVIDIA_GSYNC_Product_Video.mp4

23:40 Download Google Maps
Patrick uses Navigon on his phone to get directions in places where there’s no cell phone coverage… find out how you can download Google Maps to do the same thing for free in the video!

27:30 Fire Maps
Never traveled in the West during the summer? You might not have checked a fire map: The Oregonian has a slick one for the whole US, you can check official state maps for Oregon, California, Idaho… you get the idea!
http://projects.oregonlive.com/wildfires/map#7/44.980/-118.581
http://www.oregon.gov/ODF/Fire/pages/FireStats.aspx
http://www.fire.ca.gov/general/firemaps
http://www.idahofireinfo.com/p/maps.html

28:48 Password Managers Cracked?!?
Bai Shen tweeted out a link to @aprilwright tweeting about Elcomsoft’s recent August the tenth blog post, “We’ve just updated Elcomsoft Distributed Password Recovery with the ability to break master passwords” including 1Password, KeePass, LastPass and Dashlane.” Find out how to keep anybody from breaking into your password manager in the video.
https://twitter.com/baishen/status/897081205430136837
https://twitter.com/aprilwright/status/897050584137781248
https://blog.elcomsoft.com/2017/08/one-password-to-rule-them-all-breaking-into-1password-keepass-lastpass-and-dashlane/
https://www.elcomsoft.com/PR/edpr_170810_en.pdf

33:31 Do Something Analog
Like Barry, who’s having a little trouble hanging up a new hammock… watch the video to see what happened!
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Thank You Patrons! Without your support via patreon.com/tekthing, we wouldn’t be able to make the show for you every week!
https://www.patreon.com/tekthing
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EMAIL US!
ask@tekthing.com
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Amazon Associates: http://amzn.to/2gm9Egf
Subscribe: https://www.youtube.com/c/tekthing
——
Website: http://www.tekthing.com
RSS: http://feeds.feedburner.com/tekthing
THANKS!
HakShop: https://hakshop.myshopify.com/
——
SOCIAL IT UP!
Twitter: https://twitter.com/tekthing
Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/TekThing
Reddit: https://www.reddit.com/r/tekthingers
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Source: Security news

EC3-ENISA IoT Security Conference

EC3-ENISA IoT Security Conference aims to raise awareness on the security implications of the Internet of Things (IoT). The conference will enable a multi-stakeholder discussion by bringing together experts from cybercrime units, CSIRTs, international organisations, private industry, regulatory agencies, and academia.
Source: Cybersecurity and digital privacy newsletter

Source: Privacy Online

ENISA invites European utilities to join EE-ISAC Expert meeting in September

ENISA is welcoming European utilities to join its free-to-attend seminar on trusted cyber security information sharing within the European energy landscape. The programme brings together cyber-security experts working for European energy utilities and aims to deliver multi-disciplinary, cyber security knowledge sharing at European level. The event is co-organised with DG Energy of the European Commission and EE-ISAC members, which represent European utilities, Technology & Service providers, Academic institutes and Governmental & Not-for-profit organizations.
Source: Cybersecurity and digital privacy newsletter

Source: Privacy Online

European Cyber Security Challenge 2017

The European Cyber Security Challenge is an initative by the European Union Agency for Network and Information Security (ENISA) and aims at enhancing cyber security talent accross Europe and connecting high potentials with industry leading organizations. This years’s event is hosted by the Spanish National Cybersecurity Institute (INCIBE).
Source: Cybersecurity and digital privacy newsletter

Source: Privacy Online

Be a part of the European Catalogue of Cybersecurity & Privacy Service Offers

Launched in August 2017, the European Catalogue of Cybersecurity & Privacy Service Offers contains information and results from cybersecurity & privacy research and innovation initiatives funded on a European, national and regional basis. If you want your project results to get noticed then this is the place to be! The catalogue is an initiative of the EU-funded project Cyberwatching.eu, the European observatory of research and innovation in the field of cybersecurity and privacy.
Source: Cybersecurity and digital privacy newsletter

Source: Privacy Online

Raspbian Stretch has arrived for Raspberry Pi

It’s now just under two years since we released the Jessie version of Raspbian. Those of you who know that Debian run their releases on a two-year cycle will therefore have been wondering when we might be releasing the next version, codenamed Stretch. Well, wonder no longer – Raspbian Stretch is available for download today!

Disney Pixar Toy Story Raspbian Stretch Raspberry Pi

Debian releases are named after characters from Disney Pixar’s Toy Story trilogy. In case, like me, you were wondering: Stretch is a purple octopus from Toy Story 3. Hi, Stretch!

The differences between Jessie and Stretch are mostly under-the-hood optimisations, and you really shouldn’t notice any differences in day-to-day use of the desktop and applications. (If you’re really interested, the technical details are in the Debian release notes here.)

However, we’ve made a few small changes to our image that are worth mentioning.

New versions of applications

Version 3.0.1 of Sonic Pi is included – this includes a lot of new functionality in terms of input/output. See the Sonic Pi release notes for more details of exactly what has changed.

Raspbian Stretch Raspberry Pi

The Chromium web browser has been updated to version 60, the most recent stable release. This offers improved memory usage and more efficient code, so you may notice it running slightly faster than before. The visual appearance has also been changed very slightly.

Raspbian Stretch Raspberry Pi

Bluetooth audio

In Jessie, we used PulseAudio to provide support for audio over Bluetooth, but integrating this with the ALSA architecture used for other audio sources was clumsy. For Stretch, we are using the bluez-alsa package to make Bluetooth audio work with ALSA itself. PulseAudio is therefore no longer installed by default, and the volume plugin on the taskbar will no longer start and stop PulseAudio. From a user point of view, everything should still work exactly as before – the only change is that if you still wish to use PulseAudio for some other reason, you will need to install it yourself.

Better handling of other usernames

The default user account in Raspbian has always been called ‘pi’, and a lot of the desktop applications assume that this is the current user. This has been changed for Stretch, so now applications like Raspberry Pi Configuration no longer assume this to be the case. This means, for example, that the option to automatically log in as the ‘pi’ user will now automatically log in with the name of the current user instead.

One other change is how sudo is handled. By default, the ‘pi’ user is set up with passwordless sudo access. We are no longer assuming this to be the case, so now desktop applications which require sudo access will prompt for the password rather than simply failing to work if a user without passwordless sudo uses them.

Scratch 2 SenseHAT extension

In the last Jessie release, we added the offline version of Scratch 2. While Scratch 2 itself hasn’t changed for this release, we have added a new extension to allow the SenseHAT to be used with Scratch 2. Look under ‘More Blocks’ and choose ‘Add an Extension’ to load the extension.

This works with either a physical SenseHAT or with the SenseHAT emulator. If a SenseHAT is connected, the extension will control that in preference to the emulator.

Raspbian Stretch Raspberry Pi

Fix for Broadpwn exploit

A couple of months ago, a vulnerability was discovered in the firmware of the BCM43xx wireless chipset which is used on Pi 3 and Pi Zero W; this potentially allows an attacker to take over the chip and execute code on it. The Stretch release includes a patch that addresses this vulnerability.

There is also the usual set of minor bug fixes and UI improvements – I’ll leave you to spot those!

How to get Raspbian Stretch

As this is a major version upgrade, we recommend using a clean image; these are available from the Downloads page on our site as usual.

Upgrading an existing Jessie image is possible, but is not guaranteed to work in every circumstance. If you wish to try upgrading a Jessie image to Stretch, we strongly recommend taking a backup first – we can accept no responsibility for loss of data from a failed update.

To upgrade, first modify the files /etc/apt/sources.list and /etc/apt/sources.list.d/raspi.list. In both files, change every occurrence of the word ‘jessie’ to ‘stretch’. (Both files will require sudo to edit.)

Then open a terminal window and execute

sudo apt-get update
sudo apt-get -y dist-upgrade

Answer ‘yes’ to any prompts. There may also be a point at which the install pauses while a page of information is shown on the screen – hold the ‘space’ key to scroll through all of this and then hit ‘q’ to continue.

Finally, if you are not using PulseAudio for anything other than Bluetooth audio, remove it from the image by entering

sudo apt-get -y purge pulseaudio*

The post Raspbian Stretch has arrived for Raspberry Pi appeared first on Raspberry Pi.


Source: RaspberryPi – IOT Anonimo

Source: Privacy Online

Security Research, Innovation and Education Event 2017

SRE2017 will offer a content-rich Security Research Conference (SRC) and an exhibitors’ area.
This year it will have two High-level Panels focusing on “From research to practitioners and
end-users” and on “The future of security research”. Other panels will focus on how to respond to
terrorist attacks, tools for the police, managing dematerialised borders and managing
multi-country disaster situations.
Source: Cybersecurity and digital privacy newsletter

Source: Privacy Online

Hak5 2223 – #WiFiCactus & Building Better Risk Management – DEF CON 25

This week we’re joined by D4rkm4tter of palshack.org to chat all about the WiFi Cactus, then John Nye calls in to discuss risk management and why we suck at it.

——————————-
Shop: http://www.hakshop.com
Support: http://www.patreon.com/threatwire
Subscribe: http://www.youtube.com/hak5
Our Site: http://www.hak5.org
Contact Us: http://www.twitter.com/hak5
Threat Wire RSS: https://shannonmorse.podbean.com/feed/
Threat Wire iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/podcast/threat-wire/id1197048999
Help us with Translations! http://www.youtube.com/timedtext_cs_panel?tab=2&c=UC3s0BtrBJpwNDaflRSoiieQ
——————————

Darkmatter
@D4rkm4tter
http://palshack.org
http://palshack.org/the-hashtag-wifi-cactus-wificactus-def-con-25/

John Nye
@endisnye_com
http://cynergistek.com

Source: Security news

Community Profile: David Pride

This column is from The MagPi issue 55. You can download a PDF of the full issue for free, or subscribe to receive the print edition in your mailbox or the digital edition on your tablet. All proceeds from the print and digital editions help the Raspberry Pi Foundation achieve its charitable goals.

David Pride’s experiences in computer education came slightly later in life. He admits to not being a grade-A student: he left school with few qualifications, unable to pursue further education at university. There was, however, a teacher who instilled in him a passion for computers and coding which would stick with him indefinitely.

David Pride The MagPi Raspberry Pi Community Profile

David joined us at the St James’s Palace community celebration, mingling with the likes of the Duke of York, plus organisers of Jams and clubs, such as Grace and Femi

Welcome to the Community

Twenty years later, back in 2012, David heard of the Raspberry Pi – a soon-to-be-released “new little marvel” that he instantly fell for, head first. Despite a lack of knowledge in Linux and Python, he experimented and had fun. He found a Raspberry Jam and, with it, Pi enthusiasts like Mike Horne and Peter Onion. The projects on display at the Jam were enough to push David further into the Raspberry Pi rabbit hole and, after working his way through several Python books, he began to take steps into the world of formal higher education.

David Pride The MagPi Raspberry Pi Community Profile

David’s determination to access and complete further education in computing has earned him a three-year PhD studentship. Not bad for a “lousy student”

Back to School

With a Mooc qualification from Rice University under his belt, he continued to improve upon his self-taught knowledge, and was fortunate enough to be accepted to study for a master’s degree in Computer Science at the University of Hertfordshire. With a distinction for his final dissertation, David completed the course with an overall distinction for his MSc, and was recently awarded a fully funded PhD studentship with The Open University’s Knowledge Media Institute.

David Pride The MagPi Raspberry Pi Community Profile

Self-playing xylophones, Wiimote air drums, Lego sorters, Pi Wars robots, and more. David is continually hacking toys, giving them new Pi-powered life

Maker of things

The portfolio of projects that helped him to achieve his many educational successes has provided regular retweet material for the Raspberry Pi Twitter account, and we’ve highlighted his fun, imaginative work on this blog before. His builds have travelled to a range of Jams and made their way to the Raspberry Pi and Code Club stands at the Bett Show, as well as to our birthday celebrations.

David Pride The MagPi Raspberry Pi Community Profile

“Pi & Chips – with a little extra source”

His website, the pun-tastic Pi and Chips, is home to the majority of his work; David also links to YouTube videos and walk-throughs of his projects, and relates his experiences at various events. If you’ve followed any of the action across the Raspberry Pi social media channels – or indeed read any previous issues of The MagPi magazine – you’ll no doubt have seen a couple of David’s projects.

David Pride The MagPi Raspberry Pi Community Profile 4-Bot

Many readers will have come across the wonderful 4-Bot before, and it has even made an appearance alongside David in a recent Bloomberg interview. Considering the trillions of possible game positions, David made a compromise and, if you’re lucky, you may just be able to beat it

The 4-Bot, a robotic second player for the family game Connect Four, allows people to go head to head with a Pi-powered robotic arm. Using a Python imaging library, the 4-Bot splits the game grid into 42 squares, and recognises them as being red, yellow, or empty by reading the RGB value of the space. Using the minimax algorithm, 4-Bot is able to play each move within 25 seconds. Believe us when we say that it’s not as easy to beat as you’d hope. Then there’s his more recent air drum kit, which uses an old toy found at a car boot sale together with a Wiimote to make a functional air drum that showcases David’s toy-hacking abilities… and his complete lack of rhythm. He does fare much better on his homemade laser harp, though!

The post Community Profile: David Pride appeared first on Raspberry Pi.


Source: RaspberryPi – IOT Anonimo

Source: Privacy Online